Jersey Festival of Words, Day Two: Aren’t Women Inspiring?

I only attend one event on the second day of the festival because it’s a male heavy day, but what an event I attend. Clare Balding needs no introduction if you’re from or live in the UK. To most of us, she’s the most prominent female sports presenter on television. If you’re a child, she’s the author or two books about Charlie Bass and her family, which includes the horse Noble Warrior and the dog Boris.

Balding’s event is part of the school’s programme and I arrive at Jersey Opera House to find 600 very excited children. As soon as the lights dim and a promotional video for The Racehorse Who Disappeared begins to play, they’re all captivated.

‘Who’s got a brother or sister?’ Balding asks as she takes the stage. Most of the auditorium raises their hand. ‘Keep your hand up if your brother or sister is the most annoying person in the world.’ The majority of hands remain in the air, including those of the adults. [Soz, bro.] They know you better than anyone else which is why they can annoy you better than anyone else, Balding tells us by way of introducing the two brothers in her books, Harry and Larry.

On the screen are illustrations from the book and she asks the kids if they know who the illustrator is. Tony Ross is the answer and then the kids tell Balding where they’ve seen his work before: David Walliams’ books, Horrid Henry, The Little Princess and, apparently, a book called Who’s in the Loo? You can imagine how the mention of that goes down with 600 kids.

Balding says she writes about racehorses and a little girl with a close relationship with her dog because that was her when she was young. She talks about falling off her Shetland pony, aged two, and breaking her collar bone. Her father told Balding and her brother that you had to fall off and break your collar bone one hundred times before you could become a jockey, so they set about doing it. ‘If in life you see something that scares you, do it anyway,’ she tells the kids.

‘Has a female jockey ever ridden a winner of the Derby?’ The answer, it transpires, depends how you look at the question. During the actual race? No. But Balding rode Mill Reef, the 1971 Derby winner, after he recovered from the broken leg which ended his career. During his recovery, Mill Reef was kept at Balding’s father’s yard and she was one of the few people light enough to be able to sit on him without causing further damage to his leg.

The story which inspired the first Charlie Bass book, The Racehorse Who Wouldn’t Gallop, is based on another horse that was trained at Balding’s father’s yard; Loch Song got better at racing as she got older but more badly behaved in the yard, refusing to do the jumps. But then she fell in love with Balding’s father’s horse, Quirk, so they positioned him at the bottom of the gallops to encourage Quirk to jump them.

Charlie learns from Olympians in the books too. Balding displays a slide featuring Victoria Pendleton, Charlotte Dujardin and the Brownlee brothers on it. She tells their stories using one of the kids to demonstrate Alistair helping Jonny over the line in Mexico. The slide also includes a picture of Beyoncé. ‘Don’t let anyone tell you Beyoncé is not an athlete, she is an athlete.’ Balding tells of her own insecurities around her body when she was younger saying, ‘I now realise that is a ridiculous thing to spend your time worrying about’. She comments on the powerful thighs of Beyoncé, Serena Williams and Angela Merkel.

The latest book, The Racehorse Who Disappeared, is inspired by the story of Shergar. Balding tells the kids the story of Shergar’s disappearance before moving on to the athletes Charlie is inspired by in this book: Steph Houghton and the England women’s football team; the British women’s hockey team and Maddie Hinch, ‘who made goal keeping cool’; Nicola Adams, who became a boxer when she was told girls didn’t box; the Paralympian swimmer, Ellie Simmonds, with three Paralympic appearances at the age of 22, and Ellie Robinson, also a Paralympic swimmer, who approached the pool in the oversized jacket she’d been provided with, hood up, arms spread, turning an oversight into a statement. ‘You can wear confidence like a cloak,’ Balding tells the kids.

While the kids are fascinated by the stories of all these athletes, Balding’s barely got to Maddie Hinch before I realise I’m crying. To see all these women and girls on a huge screen, in a huge venue, having their achievements celebrated by a prominent female television presenter, in front of a group of school children, feels revolutionary. I buy both of the books for my 11-year-old stepson so we can read them together.

The Racehorse Who Wouldn’t Gallop – Clare Balding

The Racehorse Who Disappeared – Clare Balding